Our Story

Providing clean drinking water in rural areas with contaminated water sources and no power...

 

Does your drinking water look like this (bucket to the left, below)?  We are certain that it does not.

Source water nearby stream (left); Device (NUF500) center; product water (right)

Source water nearby stream (left); Device (NUF500) center; product water (right)

In the rural areas of third world countries where there is no power source or functioning borehole this may be the only water available to the village population.  We believe we have the perfect solution, as you can see at the background of the above picture and is why you must read on.

Exposure to the type of drinking water in the foreground of the picture, leads to significant health issues with particularly alarming morbidity and mortality in the young (age 5 and under).  Significant data are available demonstrating that contaminated water  is a significant cause of diarrheal disease, subsequent dehydration and acute kidney injury. 

Click here to read more about our Background.

Several years ago, in a hemodialysis center (treating people with kidney failure) in Israel, we saw a person collecting  hemodialysis filters, (see below) which had been used to treat patients that day, to be taken back to a plant in Tel Aviv for resterilization.  450 (~) of these recycled, resterilized filters were then aggregated into one large system, to be then placed on the site of the sewage treatment plant in Tel Aviv.  When the sewage water was electrically “pushed” through the filters, pathogen (i.e. viruses, bacteria or parasites) free water was/is produced, which is subsequently used for crop irrigation in Israel.

Hemodialysis Filters

Hemodialysis Filters

Questions arose immediately from us about this water purification device in Tel Aviv:

1. Could the water produced by this device actually be  drunk by a human being?  ANSWER YES

2. Could this huge device seen in Tel Aviv (approximately 450 filters) driven by electric powered pumps be made smaller?  ANSWER YES

3. Could it be manually pumped rather than electrically or solar powered? ANSWER YES

May we now introduce our device called the NUF500:

Filters circled in green with blue caps and handle/pump circled in red

Filters circled in green with blue caps and handle/pump circled in red

Time for a few principles of the NUF500:

Contaminated water flows from the right through the filters and free of all pathogens to the left. Periodic backwash is needed to “unclog” the filters, the frequency depends on the presence of sand or dry vegetation. The average seems to be 3 time per day for 10 – 15 minutes.

Contaminated water flows from the right through the filters and free of all pathogens to the left. Periodic backwash is needed to “unclog” the filters, the frequency depends on the presence of sand or dry vegetation. The average seems to be 3 time per day for 10 – 15 minutes.

Click here to read more about the NUF500 Device.

A few more photos of NUF500 functioning at the project sites (villages):

Happy customers leaving with 100% purified water for drinking in the home.

2,770 people currently have the NUF500 available for their use.  The first NUF500 devices were installed in May of 2015 in two remote villages in Ghana:

Villages around Kumasi, Ghana

Kumi - ~ 600 population

Boahenkwaa - ~ 250 population

In January and June of 2016, the following installations were made:

6 of the 22 villages on the estuary islands of Ada, Ghana

Kputsukpanya - ~760 population

Pediatorkope - ~400 population

Kewuse - ~ 60 population

Aflive - ~ 420 population

Ajiem - ~ 280 population

Alorkpem

To see future plans for NUF500 installations in the balance of the estuary islands above, areas of Northern Ghana and sites identified in Tanzania go to our Villages page.

Why did we use these sites in Ghana to establish our pilot project?  Kumasi was the first installations in May of 2015, due to our relationship with Dr. Sampson Antwi, a renowned professor of pediatric nephrology on staff at Komfo Anokye Teaching Hospital as well as an academic position at the Kwame Nkrumah University of Science & Technology, both in Kumasi.  Secondly, Seth Johnson, RN is originally from Ghana as well as his wife, Elizabeth, had resided in the Ada area of Ghana during their youth.  Seth was able to cultivate a solid relationship with the major hospital in Ada, as well as political and local leaders.  Due to the relationships we now have with two large hospital institutions and introductions made by Seth and Sampson, we are well equipped to expand our project.  Enjoy our photos of our friends and villages:

Easy Water for Everyone has the following mission statement:

Providing clean drinking water in rural areas with contaminated water sources and no power.

With this mission statement our goal is to establish, via pre- and post-data collection,  an adequately powered study  that will demonstrate the effect of the provision of clean water on public health focusing on the incidence of diarrhea and consequent illnesses. 

Click here to read more about our Data Collection.